Transformation of CENS 303A ("Representations of the Holocaust") into an online course

Title Transformation of CENS 303A ("Representations of the Holocaust") into an online course
Faculty/College/Unit Arts
Status Active
Duration 2 Year
Initiation 04/01/2015
Funding Details
Year 1: Project Year Year 1
Year 1: Funding Year 2015/2016
Year 1: Project Type Small TLEF
Year 1: Principal Investigator Bozena Karwowska
Year 1: Funded Amount 39,497
Year 1: Team Members

Anja Nowak, PhD student, Department of Central, Eastern & Northern European Studies (CENES)

Year 1: Summary

One of the most pressing issues in Holocaust studies is the question how to educate students about Nazi crimes when there are no survivors left. Following the model of multidisciplinary inquiry, developed by UBC and the Auschwitz-Birkenau Museum, we propose to transform CENS 303A into an online course (for UBC and non-UBC students), in which the generational change is addressed in an innovative outcome-based teaching and learning environment. The idea stems from the international seminar Witnessing Auschwitz (May-June 2014) which generated an international interest in a model of Holocaust education that involves undergraduate research. UBC is currently the only North American university offering such a program and there is considerable interest in developing a long-term strategy to offer the seminar on a regular basis; therefore there is a significant interest, both at and outside of UBC, in the preparatory course CENS 303A, currently offered as a mixed mode course.

Year 2: Project Year Year 2
Year 2: Funding Year 2016/2017
Year 2: Project Type Small TLEF
Year 2: Principal Investigator Bozena Karwowska
Year 2: Funded Amount 10,503
Year 2: Team Members

Anja Nowak, PhD student, Department of Central, Eastern & Northern European Studies (CENES)

Year 2: Summary

Having completed the preliminary transformation of CENS 303A (developed by UBC and the Auschwitz-Birkenau Museum) into an online course following the model of multidisciplinary inquiry, we would like to expand our efforts in order to address the unprecedented level of student interest, while respecting the sensitive nature of the topic. The large class size asks for additional tools and teaching methods: incorporation of more undergraduate research, tools for small group interaction and projects, and additional participatory activities and material.

The feedback of the first full online course (term 2, 2015/2016) will provide the necessary guidance.

Given that UBC is currently the only North American university offering such a program, developed in partnership with the Auschwitz- Birkenau State Museum, and further enriched by a new agreement with the Jewish Historical Institute, there is considerable international interest in the course. Therefore, we are planning to extend the course to non-UBC students.