Our Cheating Hearts: Academic Integrity Curriculum Design in First-Year Arts Programs

TitleOur Cheating Hearts: Academic Integrity Curriculum Design in First-Year Arts Programs
Faculty/College/UnitArts
StatusActive
Duration3 Years
Initiation04/01/2017
Funding Details
Year 1: Project TitleOur Cheating Hearts? Changing the Conversation through Academic Integrity Curriculum in First-Year Arts Programs
Year 1: Project YearYear 1
Year 1: Funding Year2017/2018
Year 1: Project TypeLarge TLEF
Year 1: Principal InvestigatorLaurie McNeill
Year 1: Funded Amount63,002
Year 1: Team Members

Laurie McNeill, Chair, First-Year Programs / Senior Instructor, Faculty of Arts
Stefania Burk, Associate Dean Academic, Faculty of Arts
Christina Hendricks, Professor of Teaching / Chair, Arts One
Brandon Konoval, Instructor I, Arts One
Evan Mauro, 12-month Lecturer, Coordinated Arts Program
Laila Ferreira, 12-month Lecturer, Arts Studies in Research and Writing
Kate Power, Instructor (limited term), Arts Studies in Research and Writing
Jackie Rea, Senior Instructor, Vantage One
Julie Mitchell, Managing Librarian, Chapman Learning Commons / UBC Library
Nicholas Thornton, Learning Commons Coordinator, Chapman Learning Commons
Meghan Aube, Program Manager, Centre for Writing and Scholarly Communication
Jason Myers, Faculty Liaison, Arts ISIT / Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology

Year 1: Summary

In partnership with the Chapman Learning Commons, this project seeks to revise curricula in Arts First-Year Programs (FYP) to better introduce students to academic integrity and its practices, providing them with the framework for understanding ethical scholarship and how to produce it. It expands on a pilot underway for W2016, the goal of which is to design and implement curricular materials in writing courses taught in the three Faculty of Arts First Year Programs: Arts One, the Coordinated Arts Program (CAP), and WRDS 150. This pilot responds to three areas of concern: 1. The lack of coherence in how UBC Arts students are educated about academic integrity; 2. The typical instructional focus on policies and consequences related to academic dishonesty rather than helping students understand academic integrity and why it matters; and 3. The ubiquity of academic dishonesty, which suggests that existing curricula is ineffective.

Year 1: TLEF ShowcaseYear 1: TLEF Showcase
Year 2: Project TitleOur Cheating Hearts? Changing the Conversation through Academic Integrity Curriculum in First-Year Arts Programs
Year 2: Project YearYear 2
Year 2: Funding Year2018/2019
Year 2: Project TypeLarge TLEF
Year 2: Principal InvestigatorLaurie McNeill
Year 2: Funded Amount44,079
Year 2: Team Members

Laurie McNeill, Chair, First-Year Programs / Senior Instructor, Faculty of Arts
Stefania Burk, Associate Dean Academic, Faculty of Arts
Brandon Konoval, Instructor I, Arts One
Evan Mauro, 12-month Lecturer, Coordinated Arts Program
Laila Ferreira, 12-month Lecturer, Arts Studies in Research and Writing
Jackie Rea, Senior Instructor, Vantage One / Arts Studies in Research and Writing
Moberley Luger, 12-month Lecturer, Coordinated Arts Program
Brianne Orr Alvarez, Instructor, Arts One
Katja Thieme, Instructor, Vantage One / Arts Studies in Research and Writing
Nazih El-Bezre, Vantage One / Arts Studies in Research and Writing
Julie Mitchell, Assistant Director (Interim), Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Chapman Learning Commons / UBC Library
Nicholas Thornton, Learning Commons Coordinator, Chapman Learning Commons
Jason Myers, Faculty Liaison, Arts ISIT / Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology

Year 2: Summary

Conversations about contemporary problems in higher education often focus on detecting or policing academic misconduct. In keeping with recent scholarship on teaching and learning, we wish to reframe these conversations to focus instead on a pedagogy of academic integrity, a fundamental value of the scholarly community. Our encounters with and research on students’ experience suggest that not only do many of them not understand academic integrity or why it matters, but they also feel tremendous anxiety about the consequences of their lack of understanding and seek more support. This TLEF builds on its successful first year of funding that has implemented new curricula in 36 FYP and 8 Vantage College sections. We have developed, implemented and assessed a host of academic resources, including new curricular materials, to support ethical research, writing, and learning practices and develop a community of academic integrity practice. We wish to continue evaluation for eventual implementation into all First Year Programs.

Year 2: TLEF ShowcaseYear 2: TLEF Showcase
Year 3: Project YearYear 3
Year 3: Funding Year2019/2020
Year 3: Project TypeLarge TLEF
Year 3: Principal InvestigatorLaurie McNeill
Year 3: Funded Amount15,626
Year 3: Team Members

Laurie McNeill, Senior Instructor / Chair, First-Year Programs, English, Faculty of Arts
Julie Mitchell, Assistant Director (Interim), Irving K. Barber Learning Centre, Chapman Learning Commons / UBC Library
Alex Kuskowski, Learning Services Librarian
Patty Kelly, Program Manager, Centre for Writing and Scholarly Communication
Jason Myers, Faculty Liaison, Arts ISIT / Centre for Teaching, Learning and Technology

Year 3: Summary

Conversations about contemporary problems in higher education often focus on detecting or policing academic misconduct. In keeping with recent scholarship on teaching and learning, we wish to reframe these conversations to focus instead on a pedagogy of academic integrity, a fundamental value of the scholarly community. Our encounters with and research on students’ experience suggest that not only do many of them not understand academic integrity or why it matters, but they also feel tremendous anxiety about the consequences of their lack of understanding and seek more support. This TLEF addresses this issue by designing and implementing academic integrity curriculum in Arts’ First-Year Programs and Vantage College writing courses. These materials support students and faculty to foster more robust understandings of ethical research, writing, and learning practices, and develop a community of practice to bring faculty and staff together across the UBC campus.