Cultivating citizenship skills through teaching and learning in the humanities

Title Cultivating citizenship skills through teaching and learning in the humanities
Faculty/College/Unit Arts
Status Active
Duration 2 Year
Initiation 04/01/2015
Funding Details
Year 1: Project Year Year 1
Year 1: Funding Year 2015/2016
Year 1: Project Type Small TLEF
Year 1: Principal Investigator Michael Griffin
Year 1: Funded Amount 5,670
Year 1: Team Members

Marlise Hofer, MA Candidate, Department of Psychology

Year 1: Summary

Policymakers and students both describe “citizenship skills” as desirable learning outcomes and graduate attributes in higher education (UBC 2009, Banks 2007, Sax 2004). This project aims to identify methods of teaching and learning within the humanities that are correlated with a positive increase in citizenship skills, using validated psychological measures of perspective-taking, empathy, interpersonal and intercultural fluency, and tolerance of ambiguity (outlined below). We aim to test the hypothesis that the rigorous and charitable study of literature and philosophy drawn from diverse cultural traditions positively influence traits perceived to be conducive to good citizenship (cf. Kidd & Castano 2013); if true, we aim to identify content and pedagogical perspectives and practices that are correlated with this influence, to modify the pilot courses (enrolling approximately 560 students) in year 2, and to disseminate these results within and beyond the university community.

Year 2: Project Year Year 2
Year 2: Funding Year 2016/2017
Year 2: Project Type Small TLEF
Year 2: Principal Investigator Michael Griffin
year-2 funded-amount 9,038
Year 2: Team Members

Marlise Hofer, MA Candidate, Department of Psychology

Year 2: Summary

Policymakers and students both describe “citizenship skills” as desirable learning outcomes and graduate attributes in higher education (UBC 2009, Banks 2007, Sax 2004). This project aims to identify methods of teaching and learning within the humanities that are correlated with a positive increase in citizenship skills, using validated psychological measures of perspective-taking, empathy, interpersonal and intercultural fluency, and tolerance of other’s values (outlined below). We aim to test the hypothesis that the rigorous and charitable study of literature and philosophy drawn from diverse cultural traditions positively influence traits perceived to be conducive to good citizenship (cf. Kidd & Castano 2013); if true, we aim to identify content and pedagogical perspectives and practices that are correlated with citizenship skills by creating pilot courses on several hundred students in year one, adapting and expanding in year two, and to disseminating these results within and beyond the university community.