How to communicate with people with aphasia: Establishing an innovative speech-language pathology clinical placement to provide experiential interprofessional learning for health profession students in Northern B.C. – A pilot project

Title How to communicate with people with aphasia: Establishing an innovative speech-language pathology clinical placement to provide experiential interprofessional learning for health profession students in Northern B.C. - A pilot project
Faculty/College/Unit Medicine
Status Active
Duration 1 Year
Initiation 04/01/2017
Funding Details
Year 1: Project Year Year 1
Year 1: Funding Year 2017/2018
Year 1: Project Type Small TLEF
Year 1: Principal Investigator Tami Howe
Year 1: Funded Amount 49,800
Year 1: Team Members

Marcia Choi, M.Sc. RSLP, SLP(C) Academic Coordinator of Clinical Education, School of Audiology and Speech Sciences, Faculty of Medicine
Elaina McCarron, RSLP, Chief Speech-Language Pathologist, UHNBC Prince George BC, Northern Health
Robin Roots RPT, Coordinator of Clinical Education Northern and Rural Cohort, UBC Department of Physical Therapy / UNBC
Valter Ciocca, Ph.D, Director, School of Audiology and Speech Sciences, Faculty of Medicine
Eavan Sinden, M.Ed. RSLP, Instructor, Acquired Language Disorders, Clinical Teaching and Coordinator Team, School of Audiology and Speech Sciences, Faculty of Medicine
Jessica Barclay, MSc. 2017 Candidate, Speech-Language Pathology, UBC School of Audiology and Speech Sciences
Danielle Bigiolli, MSc 2017 Candidate, Speech-Language Pathology, UBC School of Audiology and Speech Sciences
Rheanne Brownridge, MSc 2017 Candidate, Speech-Language Pathology, UBC School of Audiology and Speech Sciences
Kean Leung, MSc 2017 Candidate, Speech-Language Pathology, UBC School of Audiology and Speech Sciences

Project Summary

In 2015, a 50% increase in MSc. Speech-Language Pathology (SLP) seats resulted in the need to provide a total of 288 clinical placements for 72 students over a two-year program (an increase from 192 placements). To address a critical shortage of adult placements, the SASS is seeking innovative placement models with a focus in Northern B.C. where SLP services are scarce, especially for adults with aphasia, a communication disorder experienced by 20-30% of people after stroke.

The SASS and its partners at the University Hospital of Northern B.C. have identified a unique opportunity for interprofessional experiential learning involving groups of SLPs and other health profession students. The School proposes a sustainable student SLP clinic for people with aphasia (PWA) post-stroke which would also enable other health profession students to benefit from interprofessional communication partner training and practice based on the evidence-based program Supported Conversation for Adults with Aphasia.